February 14, 2021

This week’s one hour radio broadcast with host Jim Fausone has two guests.

  • Clifford Worthy, the great-grandson of slaves, was one of the few African-American men of his generation who was accepted and excelled as a Black Knight of the Hudson, a traditional nickname for West Point cadets.
  • Erica Robertson explains her decision to join the Navy, and how it was transformational in her life.

Worthy and Robertson - Black History Month

Hosted by Jim Fausone

Colonel Clifford Worthy West Point Black Knight

Colonel Clifford Worthy, West Point Black Knight of Hudson

Clifford Worthy, the great-grandson of slaves, was one of the few African-American men of his generation who was accepted and excelled as a Black Knight of the Hudson, a traditional nickname for West Point cadets. Worthy describes his journey to West Point, the many challenges he overcame both in his family and in the U.S. Army, including service in the front lines of Vietnam.

In the late 1940s, the doors to the U.S. Military Academy at West Point were closed to most young African-American men. The few who had attended the prestigious military academy before that were subjected to relentless abuse and few survived. Worthy took the chance of reaching out to U.S. Rep. John Dingell Sr., who had been a proud part of the New Deal in Washington, D.C. and was ready to unlock closed doors.

Colonel Clifford Worthy’s commitment to faith, family and service included his loving support of his son Mark, who was born with developmental disabilities at a time when the boy’s disabilities were not widely understood. That part of this memoir already is inspiring readers who share that long journey with loved ones who live with disabilities. Cliff talks to host Jim Fausone about life over 5 decades and the lessons he has learned.

Erica Robertson Little Black Girl Productions

Erica Robertson, Trauma Resiliency for Youth

Erica Robertson holds a MBA from University of Michigan, worked for Accenture consulting and Nike as a change agent.

She is now a K – 12 Education crusader and change agent in Metro Detroit. She wrote about her upbringing and intergenerational trauma in her book “Adventures of a Little Black Detroit Girl”. Her story is that of a single mother at 18, working two minimum wage jobs to make ends meet.

This interview focuses on the reasons she joined the Navy and what she got out of that service. Erica explains how it was transformational in her life and she wishes more young people would consider a few years in service.

Education at Scale, a 501c3

Erica’s now focused on education for children of color and her 501c3 “Education at Scale” and her publishing company “Little Black Girl Adventures”. 

For More Information and to Order the Book: www.littleblackdetroitgirl.com

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All Gave Some. Some Gave All. Always Remember